Lynda Benglis: New Work
September 8 – October 22, 2016
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Cheim & Read is pleased to announce Lynda Benglis: New Work, an exhibition opening on September 8, 2016, and running through October 22. A catalogue will be available with an essay by Nancy Princenthal. This is Benglis’s sixth exhibition with the gallery.

 

Since the 1960s, Lynda Benglis has been celebrated for the free, ecstatic forms she has poured, thrown and molded in ceramic, latex, polyurethane and bronze. In her new work she turns to handmade paper, which she wraps around a chicken wire armature, often painting the sand-toned surface in bright, metallic colors offset by strokes of deep, coal-based black. At other times she leaves the paper virtually bare.

 

These works reflect the environment in which they were made, the “sere and windblown” landscape of Santa Fe, New Mexico, as Princenthal writes in her essay. “It is possible to see the bleached bones of the land—its mesas and arroyos; its scatterings of shed snakeskins and animal skeletons—in the new sculptures’ combination of strength and delicacy.”

 

Simultaneously playful and visceral, the new works enter into a lively dialogue with Benglis’s previous explorations of materials and form, but with a raw immediacy inherent to the moist strips of paper she uses as their skin. Stretched, crimped and torn into richly organic shapes, the paper becomes both the sculpture’s shell and a repository of the artist’s touch. “The flexibility of the paper is marvelous; it’s just very loving,” she tells the filmmaker Burrill Crohn in Benglis Skin Deep, a video interview on the making of this body of work.

 

The sculptures are light and open, with slits and apertures revealing their wire supports. “I’m drawing with air, and wire, and paper,” Benglis remarks in the interview. Princenthal compares the paper skins to shattered piñatas and animal hides, as well as to the kites that the artist’s father made by hand (Benglis attends the kite festival held yearly at Ahmedabad, India, where she maintains a residence).

 

As a counterweight to the paper sculptures, Benglis will also exhibit The Fall Caught, a new large-scale aluminum work made by applying spray foam instead of strips of handmade paper on the chicken wire armature, as well as a new series of spiraling, hand-built black ceramics called Elephant Necklace. Benglis has said of this work, “Elephants necklaces are artifacts that I imagine in the long and short of the extrusions of life. The expulsion from the garden with the umbilical cord attached are perhaps the fragments left of the family of mammoths trunks.  Having left only parts of their trunks in our imagination, I long to find out more about them through a united collaboration with Saxe Patterson, my exploration team, and others who may decide to question their existence in this hemisphere.”

 

The sexual politics at the heart of Benglis’s career is intrinsic to this work. The cylindrical shape of many of Benglis’s new sculptures can bring to mind phalluses and vaginas (“considered as tubes, one becomes the other”), and yet, as Princenthal observes, “Of all the sensations her work evokes, pure delight is among the keenest.”

 

Lynda Benglis is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and two National Endowment for the Arts grants, among other commendations. Her work is held in extensive public collections including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

 

Throughout 2016, the Bergen Assembly in Bergen, Norway, is hosting a series of exhibitions devoted to Benglis’s videos and sculpture. The Aspen Art Museum’s Roof Deck Sculpture Garden will host a group of her fountains through the end of October. In September, a major survey of Benglis’s work will inaugurate the Museo Internacional del Barroco in Puebla, Mexico, this is the first show of Benglis’s work in Latin America.
 


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Lynda Benglis: Defining Post-Minimalism, 1968–1990
Frieze Masters, Regent’s Park, London
October 5 – 8, 2017
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The New York Times 7/29/16
The Female Gaze, Part Two: Women Look at Men
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Lynda Benglis & Adam Fuss: Knots and Entrails
The Art Show / Park Avenue Armory
March 7 – 11, 2012
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The Women in Our Life: A Fifteen Year Anniversary Exhibition
June 30 – September 17, 2011
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Abstractions by Gallery Artists
September 24 – October 3, 2009
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The Female Gaze
Women Look At Women
June 25 – September 19, 2009
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Brooklyn Rail 3/08
Lynda Benglis, Louise Bourgeois, Louise Fishman
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I Am As You Will Be
The Skeleton in Art
September 20 – November 3, 2007
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New York Times 7/13/07
Lynda Benglis, Louise Bourgeois
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Circa 70: Lynda Benglis and Louise Bourgeois
June 21 – August 31, 2007
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Monique Prieto: New Paintings / Lynda Benglis: THE GRACES
September 10 – October 15, 2005
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Lynda Benglis
A Sculpture Survey 1969 - 2004
February 26 – April 3, 2004
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Bettina Rheims / Lynda Benglis
Bettina Rheims: Chambre Close, 1991Lynda Benglis: Quartered Meteor, 1969
October 15 – November 16, 2002
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Liquid Properties
Artists include: Lynda Benglis, Louise Bourgeois, Richmond Burton, Adam Fuss, Mary Heilmann, David Hines, Gary Hume, Dona Nelson, Jack Pierson, Pat Steir, Juan
July 6 – August 3, 2001
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Opulent
Artists Include: Lynda Benglis, Richmond Burton, St. Clair Cemin, Beatriz Milhazes, Chris Ofili, Jeff Perrone, Philip Taaffe, and Juan Uslé
June 14 – September 1, 2000
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Lynda Benglis / Wols
Lynda Benglis: New WorkWols (1913 - 1951): Photographs of the 1930s
October 19 – November 13, 1999
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Lynda Benglis
Recent Sculpture and a screening of "Female Sensibility" from 1973
September 12 – October 10, 1998
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Small Paintings
HAND PAINTED PICTURES by Ingo Meller, Louise Fishman, Juan Uslé, Richmond Burton, Joan Mitchell, Mary Heilmann, Bill Jensen, Jack Pierson, Dona Nelson, Eva Hes
July 1 – 31, 1998
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Group Show: Benglis, Fuss, Salle, Spitzer
June 5 – July 31, 1997
 
Lynda Benglis at Museo Internacional del Barroco in Puebla, Mexico

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